Bob Dylan Prints

Elliott Landy author of Woodstock Vision: The Spirit of a Generation and The Band Photographs penned a fascinating article about the making of Bob Dylan Prints and his history of interaction with the famous singer:

Here is part of that article:

Elliott Landy talks about photographing Bob Dylan in an excerpt from his book, Woodstock Vision. A selection of Bob Dylan Prints are available in the e-shop. 

Bob Dylan Prints

Bob Dylan Prints

The first time I photographed Dylan was at the Woody Guthrie Memorial Concert at Carnegie Hall in New York City in 1967. It was his first public appearance since his motorcycle accident a year earlier. He was playing with The Band, who were unknown at that time.

I was just starting my photographic career and wanted to see the show as well as take some pictures that I could sell. So I called up Dylan’s office, identified myself as a photographer for an underground newspaper, and asked for two press tickets. I brought my cameras to the concert, assuming that since they’d given me tickets as a photographer, I could take photographs. But when I got to Carnegie Hall, there were signs posted stating “No Photographs Allowed,” and the ushers insisted that I check my cameras. I argued, showing my press pass and the tickets from Dylan’s office, but to no avail. So I said, “OK, no pictures allowed,” and checked half my cameras, but kept the other half—everything that would fit into my pockets and my date’s bag.

Bob Dylan Prints – With The Band, Woodie Guthrie Memorial Concert, Carnegie Hall, NYC, 1968. Levon Helm, Rick Danko, Robbie Robertson, Richard Manuel, Garth Hudson.

I had a good seat near the front of the hall. Dylan came on stage, and I started snapping away, clicking my shutter only during the loud passages in order to be as discreet as possible.

After a couple of songs Arlene Cunningham, who worked for Dylan’s manager, Albert Grossman, spotted me taking photographs. Soon she and Albert, whom I did not know at the time, and a guard were all waving to me from the side of the hall telling me to stop taking photographs. I pretended not to see their increasingly frantic waving.

Then Albert gestured to the guard to get me out of the seat. Meanwhile Dylan was playing with The Band, and it was very exciting. The guard came toward me. I knew what was going to happen next. They always go for your film.

Read the full article about Bob Dylan Prints here.

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